Microwave Theory and Techniques Chapter -- MTT17

The IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) is a transnational society with more than 11,000 members and 150 chapters worldwide.  Our Society promotes the advancement of microwave theory and its applications, including RF, microwave, millimeter-wave, and terahertz technologies. Members of MTT-S are engaged in research, development, design, or manufacturing of high frequency materials, devices, circuits, components, or systems.

 

What's Happening in Microwave Theory & Techniques?

Upcoming Event -- September 26th, 2013

Event -- MRI Safety/Compatibility Considerations for Medical Devices

Find more information about the event HERE

 

Microwave Theory & Techniques Society
http://www.mtt.org/

 

About theTwin Cities Chapter

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Chapter Upcoming meetings

RF Aspects of Magnetic Resonance Imaging - TWIN CITIES MTT17 CHAPTER on 04-December-2014
11/26/2014 11:03:51 AM
JOINT UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT AND IEEE MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES SOCIETY TWIN CITIES CHAPTER COLLOQUIUM

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners are an important diagnostic tool for the medical practitioner. MRI provides a non-invasive means of imaging soft tissues and to obtain real-time images of the cardiovascular system and other dynamic changes in the human body. MRI scanners rely heavily on a number of topical areas of interest to Electrical Engineers: image processing, high speed computing and RF (radio frequency) systems and components. This presentation will focus on some of the RF aspects of the MR process and MR scanners. A primer on the physical phenomenon behind magnetic resonance will start the presentation and include a discussion of the origin of the MR signal. The need for the high static magnetic field (B0), the use of gradient coils for MR signal location, simple RF pulse sequences and how they are used in image construction will be covered. This MR image construction process and the control of the various steps that manipulate the atomic nuclei to generate the final MR diagnostic image put demanding constraints on RF equipment capabilities and these will be discussed, along with a high-level overview of the various components making up conventional MRI systems. This high-level overview will include a look at various examples of transmit and receive RF systems and examples of transmit and receive coils that make up MR scanners and system diagrams for both the RF transmit and receive paths. The talk with then narrow in scope to look at how these RF coils are modeled and controlled in both transmit and receive states and how these components are used for transmit/receive switching and patient and equipment protection.